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Nutrition for Your Shingles and Post-Herpetic Neuralgia Patients

Nutrition Planning – A Little Something Extra for Your Postherpetic Neuralgia Patients

Treating the postherpetic neuropathy or shingles patient can be challenging.

They’ve already been through the pain of shingles…

The rash is gone and they expected to be normal again.

What they didn’t count on was postherpetic neuropathy.

Chances are by the time they reach your office, they’re frustrated…depressed…irritable.

The medications aren’t working and they’re looking for a solution.

Something…anything…to make their postherpetic neuropathy pain stop and give them back their lives.

As a postherpetic neuropathy specialist, you’re in a unique position to give them what they need to heal. The missing pieces of the treatment puzzle that they haven’t addressed before now.

That Little Something Extra – A Good Nutrition Plan

Your postherpetic neuropathy patient is probably accustomed to hearing the “take 2 of these and call me in the morning” approach to their neuropathy pain. That approach hasn’t worked or they wouldn’t be in your office. They need address the most basic ingredient in healing the human body – nutrition.

There are certain vitamins and minerals that have been shown to lessen the pain caused by shingles and postherpetic neuropathy. Your postherpetic neuropathy patients need to make sure they’re getting these vitamins and minerals, in healthy amounts, to give their body what it needs to heal.

This is where you come in. By providing nutrition counseling services to your postherpetic neuropathy patient, you not only address their actual real-time physical symptoms, you give them vital information they need to participate in their own care and take control of their health again.

Make sure that any nutrition planyou prescribe for your postherpetic neuropathy patients includes:

– Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitaminsto promote nerve health. Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase their feeling of well- being.

– Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.

– Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calciumand magnesium. Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse transmission and, as an added bonus, give the immune system a boost.

– Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and Cto help repair skin and boost the immune system.

– Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin Eto promote skin health and ease the pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

– A good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in their daily nutrition.

Advise them to avoid:

– Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.

– Fried foods and all other fatty foods. Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing they need when fighting postherpetic neuropathy.

– High protein foods like animal protein. High-protein foods elevate the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress which will only make them more irritable.

– Alcoholic beverages. Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

– Processed sugar. They don’t have to eliminate sweets completely, just control them. Keeping blood sugar levels constant will help control irritability.

– Control salt intake. Opt for a salt substitute with potassium instead of sodium and stay away from preserved foods like bacon, ham, pickles, etc. Reducing salt intake will help ease inflammation and that alone will work wonders in the healing process.

Sit down and discuss your postherpetic neuropathy patient’s lifestyle and diet as part of the initial consultation process. The information gained will help you devise a nutrition plan tailor made for your patient and help to build a rapport between you. And pay close attention to the responses you receive in that first meeting – they will give you a good idea as to whether or not you have a compliant patient.

Stress Management Strategies

Now that you’ve addressed the nutrition portion of the postherpetic neuropathy treatment program, talk to your patient about their stress level. Even with good nutrition, if they’re letting the stress of life and postherpetic neuropathy get the better of them, their body is working too hard. They’re expending energy battling stress that could be used to fight postherpetic neuropathy.

Put together a lifestyle plan for your patient utilizing patient appropriate stress management tools. Some suggestions might be:

– Exercising regularly. If they’re physically capable, a brisk 15 minute walk every day is a good place to start.

– Relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, tai chi, yoga or meditation. Any of these will calm the mind and, in turn, calm the body and nerves.

– Finding a hobby that will take the mind off postherpetic neuropathy pain.

The combination of nutrition and stress management will do wonders for your postherpetic neuropathy patients. When used in concert with the other medical treatment options available to you, you may just give these patients a new lease on life and build healthy habits that will remain with them long after the pain of postherpetic neuropathy is a distant memory.

We hope this gives you some insight on nutrition counseling and diet planning for your postherpetic neuropathy patients. Offering these services can be the missing piece of the treatment puzzle that you’ve been looking for in treating this challenging patient population. The addition of these services to your treatment options can help you build a successful medical practice as well.

When you’re trained and ready to offer these services, let them know you’re there.

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How to Cure Loud Stomach Noises

Loud stomach noises can be very embarrassing and can be caused by a variety of reasons. The biggest factor with loud stomach noise is diet, some people are more sensitive to some foods than others. While it can be something that is just as simple as not combining some food types. Eating high sugar foods with carbohydrates can be a cause of this – for example; if for lunch you ate a sandwich and an apple.

There is a solution to this, I personally suffered from very loud stomach noises for years. My job involved working very close with people and giving training sessions and so you can imagine how this was for me. People always asking if I was still hungry straight after lunch got a little boring after a while, this would lead to me not eating during the day to avoid the embarrassment but then I would get hungry and my concentration would lapse – it was not a happy way to be and so I set out to overcome this problem.

I visited my doctor and told him of my symptoms which included gurgling stomach noises after eating, gas or wind, a bloated stomach, a painful stomach if I remained seated for long periods of time and very often diarrhea. The doctor told me that these symptoms all fall under the ‘cloud’ of IBS – irritable bowel syndrome and that it is a condition which they don’t know what causes it but it can be related to stress and he suggested I write a food diary to see when it was at its worse. The food diary idea was interesting but it didn’t produce any worthwhile results. The problem was not solely with what I was eating, it was with the combination of food types, it was with eating foods that the body isn’t designed to eat – like refined foods.

I came to the conclusion that as this is a digestion and food related problem then there must be a diet and food related solution. I studied a lot of books on diet over the coming months and decided that I was going to take my foods back to basics. I would only eat simple foods – like a caveman would eat. I would eat meat, fish, low sugar vegetables and eggs. I would eliminate sugar because this was a suspect in these loud stomach noises and so with this I would eliminate fruit for the first two weeks. In total I wasn’t eating more than 20 ingredients and was only drinking water and tea. The reason is because I want to give my stomach minimal foods with no carbohydrates and no sugar so basically I was eating protein salads and meat and veg in the evening. Breakfast would usually include eggs, sausages, tomatoes etc.

Within two weeks my loud stomach noises had completely cleared up. They had gone!!! It was unbelievable. I am now six months into this and have introduced more foods but very slowly – usually a weeks at a time. For anyone who has experienced similar problems then I strongly suggest trying this because I am certain it will work for most people. I believe refined foods, combining carbs with fat during meals and sugar are the cause of this problem.

The best plan that I found is the CUREIBS plan. Although the condition I had was not IBS, the strategy of this plan is still the same and works wonders – within a week!! It is great for a full list of suitable and unsuitable foods, it will provide you with great techniques along with the correct times to introduce new foods. Within no time you will be back to normal!

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Fructose Malabsorption: I Am Starving! What Can I Eat?

When beginning a diet for fructose malabsorption you want to eat as simple as possible. Give your body time to heal. A simple and delicious recipe that is very healing and easy to digest is fresh, steamed spinach and white rice. This is something that you will be able to eat every day as long as you keep the portions small. Create a peaceful environment when you eat and never eat more that your belly can handle. Eat slow. Enjoy each bite. Healing the body starts from within. Meditate on love and peace in your life throughout the day. Learn proper breathing techniques and use them. Find time to relax each day.

You may or may not be able to eat the following foods. Not everyone can eat the same things and because there are multiple intolerances that people can have everyone is affected differently by certain foods. This is a guide. Remember to pay attention to your body and write down everything in a food journal or notebook. Space meals and snacks out throughout the day. Portion sizes are crucial. Sometimes ½ of a serving will be tolerated but not one whole serving. Never eat more than one serving unless you know that you can tolerate it. Start small – think fine dining. Also, always check ingredients. Not every product is made the same and often a product will change the ingredients without any warning. You must check labels each time you make a purchase. Many foods and beverages contain HFCS. HFCS is a great big no-no for fructmals. Remember that the FODMAP’s have an accumulative effect in the body. You might be okay with one serving or one food but if they have a chance to gang up on you they will. Keep them in check by knowing your limits and keeping the portions small. You can heal yourself. You are half way there. Give yourself a gold star. You are on your way to a bright, happy, full belly, rich in nutrition and satisfaction.

Meat & Protein

All meat is tolerated as there are no fructose or other fermentable carbohydrates present in meat. Organic meat is a great option because not only is it healthier but tastes much better. Keep your eyes open for added ingredients such as breading, additives, fillers and sauces as they may contain FODMAP’s. Be aware that some processed meats use lactose in the meats. Check with the deli. Fish and seafood are safe as long as there are no intolerable ingredients. Always check ingredients. It is best to prepare meals from scratch because then you know what is in them. Eggs and tofu are suitable protein sources.

Safe grains and starches

There are many safe grains and flours that are suitable for the diet. They are often found in health foods stores or online, especially in the gluten-free sections. White rice is the safest.

  • Rice Bran
  • Gluten-free flour
  • Corn flour
  • Oat bran
  • Quinoa
  • Potato
  • White rice
  • White rice noodles
  • White rice wraps
  • Gluten-free pastas
  • Oats or gluten free oats (Many prefer gluten-free.)

Sweet Treats

Real sugar, otherwise known as sucrose, is okay in small amounts. Be aware of 100% fruit spreads. They often use pear juice to sweeten them. It is best to stay away from these as pears are a big problem for fructmals. Once again, always check labels.

  • Peanut butter (Peanuts can cause difficulty in those sensitive to Candida.)
  • Jam
  • Marmalade
  • Maple syrup
  • Rice syrup
  • Dextrose
  • Smarties and sweettarts made with dextrose (Check labels for smarties and sweettarts. Sometimes they use HFCS.)

Fruit (fresh)

The quantity of these fruits are very important. Do not eat more than the portion size of a small orange at one time. Space each serving out by at least two to three hours.

  • All Berries; blueberries, boysenberry, cranberry, raspberry, strawberries, etc.
  • Citrus Fruit; oranges, lemon, grapefruit, lime, tangelo, etc.
  • Cantaloupe
  • Durian
  • Paw paw
  • Avacado (very small amount)
  • Passion fruit
  • Ripe Banana
  • Jackfruit
  • Carabola
  • Kiwi
  • Pineapple
  • Rhubarb
  • Guava
  • Grapes
  • Honeydew melon
  • Rhubarb
  • Persimmon
  • Lychee

Vegetables

Once again portion sizes are very important. There are variations among sensitivities in individuals. This is only a guide. Pay attention to your body and use your food journal.

  • Alfalfa
  • Bamboo Shoots
  • Choko
  • Bok Choy
  • Capsicum
  • Carrot
  • Mushrooms
  • Celery (small amount)
  • Zucchini
  • Tomato
  • Choy sum
  • Corn (small amount)
  • Cucumber
  • Endive
  • Zucchini
  • Tomato
  • Potato
  • Eggplant
  • Ginger
  • Sweet potato (small amount)
  • Lettuce, Iceburg
  • Olives
  • Parsnip
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Green beans
  • Turnip

Herbs, Spices and Condiments

  • Thyme
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Rosemary
  • Lemon juice
  • Lime juice
  • Basil
  • Ginger
  • Pepper
  • Golden syrup
  • Pure maple syrup
  • Chives
  • Asafoetida powder
  • Sea salt
  • Coriander
  • Garlic infused oil
  • Parsley

Beverages

  • Tea
  • Coffee (regular and decaffeinated)
  • Herbal teas
  • Hot water with lemon (strongly suggested)

Note: Caffeine can be a gastric irritant. You may want to minimize your caffeine intake if you suspect caffeine contributes to your symptoms.

Wheat and fructan restriction

Wheat-based products are only a problem when wheat is the main ingredient.

When wheat is an ingredient in only small amounts it usually is not a problem unless you are gluten intolerant or have celiac disease.

The diet for fructose malabsorption is low-wheat. You can eat rye, oats, barley and small amounts of wheat or wheat ingredients. Gluten free products are wheat-free so they are suitable for fructose malabsorption, however, you still need to be aware of fructose ingredients such as onion, honey and fruit in these products. There are many wheat ingredients that are safe, as they do not contain large amounts of fructans.

These include:

  • Wheat starch
  • Wheat thickeners
  • Wheat colour caramel
  • Wheat maltodextrin
  • Wheat dextrin
  • Wheat dextrose
  • Wheat glucose
  • Wheat glucose syrup

Lactose

Some people can tolerate low-lactose cheeses. Some low-lactose cheeses include swiss, parmesan, gouda, colby, provolone, cheddar, muenster, and monterey jack. Lactose-free milk and lactose-free cottage cheese are great sources of protein and calcium. Rice milk is another lactose-free alternative. Small servings of yogurt or lactose-free yogurt might be tolerable. Remember to use your food journal. You are an investigator and your intention is to find the healthiest diet for your unique body.

Breakfast Cereal

Remember to check labels. HFCS is a popular ingredient in many processed foods, especially cereals.

  • Oatmeal, Plain (gluten-free if possible but not necessary)
  • Corn flakes
  • Rice Bubbles
  • Rice Puffs
  • Rice flakes

Nuts and seeds (suitable in very small amounts)

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Pine nuts
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Cashews

Wishing you a happy and healthy life of love and prosperity.

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Diet As an Integral Part of Arthritis Treatment

Diet plays an integral role in arthritis treatment. However, there is no magic diet which may cure arthritis. The right attention in the diet aids in easing the symptoms. Here are few instances:

The power of omega 3

Most of the people are aware of the power of omega 3. These fatty acids come with several benefits. People suffering from arthritis have procured extensive benefits from these fatty acids. For instance, researchers reveal the fact that omega 3 fatty acids come with anti-inflammatory effects. Reduction of inflammation may reduce the flare up during arthritis. You may include freshwater fish, wild salmon and other sources of omega 3 fatty acids in the diet. Mediterranean diet comprises of a high amount of omega 3 fatty acids and thus it is considered to be good for people suffering from arthritis.

It is essential to say a no to omega 6 fatty acids. These fats are found primarily in vegetable oils and red meat such as sunflower oil and corn. Omega 6 fatty acids work in contrary to omega 3 fatty acids. They aid in boosting inflammation instead of reducing it.

Adequate amount of vitamin D

It is obvious that there is no magical diet which can cure arthritis. However, as long as you intake the right food and pay attention to the diet, the symptoms will be easier. Deficiency of vitamin D is responsible for a wide number of diseases. People suffering from vitamin D deficiency are at a higher risk of arthritis. Most of the patients suffering from arthritis are recommended to intake vitamin D in adequate amount. Vitamin D supplements are considered to be an indispensable part of arthritis treatment. Patients taking these supplements will experience reduced pain. In accordance with some clinical studies, knee pain has been diminished to a considerable extent by consumption of these supplements.

Enhance your intake of fresh vegetables and fruits

Like omega 3 fatty acids, vegetables also come with different anti-inflammatory properties. If you are willing to take benefits of these properties, you can add frozen or fresh vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts to the daily diet. You should be adding berries and cherries such as strawberries and blueberries in the diet. They comprise of a compound such as anthocyanins which are helpful for fighting inflammation. Strawberries, bell peppers, mangoes, citrus fruits and other foods that are enriched in vitamin C are considered to be essential for arthritis treatment. Intake of vitamin C on a longer term renders protection against rheumatoid arthritis.

Lean Protein

A diet comprising of lean protein such as fish, plenty of fresh veggies and fruits may be helpful for the waistline and arthritis. Weight loss aid in the reduction of the symptoms of arthritis. Pain will be eased to a considerable extent by the consumption of lean protein. The combination of exercises and diet may work wonders for easing arthritis. It is recommended for the doctor to develop an exercise routine and diet plan for easing the symptoms of arthritis.

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Is It Time to Eat?

Timing can be everything “in the right place at the right time” and this phrase can also sum up the time slot you choose to fuel your body. Now in starting the day with your first meal, we know that it means you are breaking your fast aka-breakfast. But how many of you are consuming breakfast within an hour of getting up?

I’m not clairvoyant, but somehow I think most folks may not be eating within that 60-minute window. The body metabolism slows down during the hours of sleeping in an effort to reserve energy; when you wake up it is important to fuel the body, eating the calories needed to get the body metabolism off to an optimal start.

According to the National Weight Control Registry, 78 percent of successful dieters eat breakfast daily. Eating breakfast can help in curbing the appetite and preventing overeating later in the day. The first meal of the day can also help improve mood and cognition. Good choices for the first meal of the day include carbohydrates, lean protein and healthy fat. Whole grain cereals, eggs, low-fat cheese and peanut or almond butter are examples of best breakfast options.

Throughout the day the body has a characteristic rhythm and for the best results in maintaining a goal weight I advise clients to rely on this built-in timer that is linked to the body clock and needs of each individual. Generally speaking you should eat lunch 4-1/2 to 5 hours after breakfast. Dinner should follow 4-1/2 to 5 hours after lunch.

It is important to add snacks to your diet during the day. Once considered taboo, snacking can be a curb to overeating and can help to normalize blood sugar levels. In choosing snacks during the day the best choices are not the sugar-laden treats we often consider as a gift, but whole fruits such as oranges or apples, lean proteins such as hummus, Greek-style yogurt, or a small portion of nuts.

Dinner should be consumed before 8:00 p.m. or earlier. Contrary to tradition, this meal should not be the largest meal of the day. For best health you want to consume the bulk of your calories earlier in the day, which allows time to burn the calories off during the hours when you are most active. Eating the last meal of the day earlier allows ample time for the body’s fast phase. Research shows that a fast of 8 to 12 hours is consistent with the body clock which allows time for the gut to be inactive and not digest any food. You can however have water during the overnight fast.

The science of meal timing has uncovered key points demonstrating how timing can impact success in achieving desired weight goals. Studies have shown that an evening meal can increase blood sugar levels 17 percent more that the identical meal in the morning! Similar studies have shown that more calories are burned digesting meals two hours after eating in the morning more than in the evening.

In planning meals throughout the week remember it is not just what you eat, but the time you are eating, that can help you reach your weight goals.

Take Away: Plan to eat well-balanced meals, snack wisely and adhere to the meal timing tips.

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Arthritis and Nutrition

Arthritis affects almost one in every five people in the United States. Arthritis is the broad term for hundreds of disorders that involve the joints. The two main types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. They each damage the joints in different ways. The most common signs and symptoms of arthritis could be pain, stiffness, swelling, redness, and decreases range of motion depending on the type you have. Most people are not aware that choosing healthy foods can tremendously improve the way they feel.

Many people enjoy food so much that they may not realize that what they are putting into their systems can cause inflammation in their bodies. Arthritis is a disease of inflammation so those with arthritis should focus on finding the anti-inflammatory foods they like. Daily exercise and losing weight (if overweight) will help alleviate the stress on the joints. It will also help in lowering the level of inflammation in the body. Nutrition is key! It is always a good idea to discuss a new diet with a professional.

You can fight arthritis with foods that help reduce some aspect of inflammation; Omega-3 fatty acids (salmon, rainbow trout, Pacific oysters, flaxseed and walnuts), Extra-virgin olive oil (use when cooking), Antioxidants (sweet peppers, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, pineapple, lemons, broccoli, cantaloupe, mangos, tuna, crab, tilapia, whole-wheat pasta, lean beef, cod, shrimp, turkey, sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin, apricots, spinach, onions, cherry tomatoes, blueberries, elderberries and apples), and Spices (ginger and turmeric) are among some that are known to help.

Inflammation irritates arthritic joints, causing the tissues to swell and become inflamed. Eating anti-inflammatory foods may reduce swelling, but it’s also important to know about the foods that can trigger painful inflammation. Stay away from; fried foods, sodas, refined carbs, lard, processed meats, refined oils, salts, sugars, dairy products, simple carbs, processed foods, saturated fat, trans fat, alcohol, tobacco, white rice, white flour, white bread, pasta, pastries etc.

Maintaining a healthy diet can be done by eliminating or reducing inflammatory foods. Start by reading the ingredient labels and look for indicated levels of saturated and trans fats. Compare different product brands to see which ones have lower levels of unhealthy fats and sugars. Switch to natural cooking oils like olive or avocado oil. Avoid deep fried foods or ones that have been cooked at high temperatures. Choose more low fat and trans fat-free options when buying packaged foods. Add more omega-3 fatty acids and reduce omega-6 fatty acids. Finally eat as close to natural as possible by consuming less prepackaged and processed foods.

If you have arthritis, it is important to find the foods that make you feel better. These food suggestions are guideline and not a one size fits all. Foods that cause joint pain for one person may not cause the same joint pain for the next person. Paying attention to what you are consuming can change the way you feel drastically. Stay away from the foods that cause inflammation for you and find the anti-inflammatory foods that you like! And don’t forget to exercise!

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read herein.

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Melt Away Belly Fat in 3 Weeks – Amazing Fat Loss Diet to Shrink the Midsection Very Quickly!

Here is the wonderful idea to melt away belly fat in 3 weeks time. Spend a few minutes time here to gain fantastic tips to lose fat. Since we are talking about the natural method of weight loss, you will not turn towards diet pills to shed fat.

Tip 1 – Metabolism rate should be at higher level for instant fat loss

Your body should have good metabolism rate to melt away belly fat in 3 weeks. You can hit this target only if your life style is full of nature. Yes, you should first free your body from chemicals and other diet pills that reduces metabolism rate. Replace this place with natural foods such as proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, fibrous foods and healthy fats. Vegetables, fruits, egg whites, omega fatty acids, cod liver oil, nuts, almonds, dhal are some of the natural food products that can be utilized to boost metabolism. Water should be provided in plenty for quick action of digestive system. So, when you boost metabolism through natural food products, your weight loss will be permanent and consistent.

Tip 2 – Reject all the faded foods

Faded foods or the celebrity foods should be completely avoided as they squash the metabolism rate. Each and every part of your body starts working slowly, which results in accumulation of fat. The digestion power is very less when your body is fed with faded diets. These faded foods include your fancy foods such as pizzas (contains unhealthy fats), quick bites etc.

Tip 3 – Frequent eating and calorie shifting diet

Calorie shifting diet holds the key to melt away belly fat in 3 weeks. Along with this shifting technique, you need to stick to the frequently eating habit. That is, unlike in other weight loss methods, you are not going to starve for food. Four to five time meals is compulsory for peaking up the metabolism. You can increase or decrease the calorie level in your meal and aim at higher level of metabolism.

So, along with proper nutrition, if you can do the combination of shifting technique and eating technique effectively, you will be at the winning track to melt away belly fat in 3 weeks.

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Quick Guide to The Science of Losing Weight Naturally

Losing weight is no miracle. It takes months of effort, a good exercise plan and a diet program to get the right results. If you have been struggling with those extra pounds, there are a few things that you need to understand. In this post, we will try to understand the science and details of losing weight, without with unnatural and unhealthy diets, of course.

Don’t Believe Everything

We all want to lose as many pounds as possible at the earliest. Sadly, in the quest of dropping kilos, people end up following everything that they read or hear. No cabbage soup or alkaline diet can work for your body, unless you adopt certain essential lifestyle changes. The internet is full of hoax diets, tricks, supplements, and drugs, which promise to help without any consequences. Doctors and leading health experts always advise against such traps.

Understand The Two Components

There are two important factors for losing weight, and both are equally important – diet and exercise. Dieting doesn’t mean cutting down all the foods that you like, but it is more about eating a healthy and balanced diet. This includes the right balance between all the three macronutrients – protein, carbohydrates, and fats. If you are trying to lose weight, you need to create a calorie deficit diet in the first place, which will reduce the amount of carbohydrates you take each day. The next component is exercise. You cannot lose weight, unless you start exercising. You need at least one form of activity each day, which can be anything from extensive weight training to brisk walking. If you are out of shape and exercise, you can always start with light walking for an hour, which can be combined with cardio and other exercises.

Seek Help

There are some fantastic services for people looking to lose weight, and some of these follow the actual science of art loss. These are not ‘one package fits all’ kind of programs. Instead, the experts will understand your personal issues and guide you through a metabolic weight loss program, which will include all the possible aspects, including your metabolism rate, health problems, and other concerns. You will also have a personal counselor, who will offer all kinds of assistance, so that you are motivated throughout the journey. Of course, these programs can be different from each other, so you need to choose something that’s more customized. The costs typically depend on the service, but in most custom programs, the package prices are determined by the kind of assistance you need.

With exercise and diet, you can lose weight faster than you think. This inevitably requires patience and determination. Since most people start losing steam midway, there are coaches who help in staying motivated. If you have never tried an active lifestyle, it’s time for a change. Don’t delay in seeking help, because there are no secrets out there. The sooner you start, the better benefits you will get in a shorter time. Allow your body to ease!

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Why Healthy Eating Is So Good for Hypermobility Syndrome Sufferers

So, we all know that eating healthily is good for us. We hear it enough times. It’s something we ‘should’ do. But I want to give you a personal take; make it real to you. I want you to know how much of a difference eating healthily has made to me as a Hypermobility Syndrome (HMS) sufferer and I want to give you some tips on how you can start to feel this health and vitality in your own life.

Let’s look at the facts first:

Why eating healthily is particularly good for HMS sufferers:

When our body is clean on the inside we are healthier on the outside.

Our organs of detoxification, including the liver and the kidneys, work 24/7 to keep our bodies clean. The more we eat natural food the less they have to work. This is great for two reasons: 1 – we look and feel better; 2 – our detoxification system can then spend its time doing internal ‘housework’ making sure every part of our body functions the very best it can. This means our joints can be kept healthy and recover from injury more quickly.

Eating healthily can satisfy us with fewer calories.

The more healthily we eat the more weight we’ll drop. That’s great for general health but also really important for us HMS sufferers.

Fresh food delivers us vitamins and minerals in abundance in a way that processed food cannot.

It’s very easy to be over-fed yet under-nourished when we eat a lot of processed food. If we enjoy plentiful fruit and vegetables we’ll be ensuring we deliver quality to our bodies. Vitamins and minerals are essential to ensure optimal health and functioning of our joints, tissues, bones and muscles.

• Eating more fresh fruit and vegetables, particularly greens can improve our digestion.

It’s all about having the right level of hydrochloric acid in your tummy – have a look at the writing of Victoria Boutenko for the details. Having efficient digestion is not just something that means we feel better – it also ensures we absorb more of the goodness from the food that we do eat. A double whammy!

Because our body is working less, we have more energy.

We look better and we feel better – a great way to make sure we are experiencing life in the best possible way we can at any given time.

• Because we have more energy and look better, we feel better. I know how easy it is to feel down when you have HMS. Feeling brighter on a daily basis and being happier when we look in the mirror are two all-important factors when it comes to feeling better every day.

We have less allergic response.

There are many, less healthy, foodstuffs that can cause allergies. (You can find out about the more common of these – wheat and dairy – by googling them or reading an author like Patrick Holford.) Allergies do not just show up as skin or breathing problems, they also clog up all the processes of our bodies, along with lowering our health and vitality generally. If we give our body a break from these we can function at a much more healthy level.

The body was designed for the natural sugar in fruit.

Eating less processed sugar and replacing it with natural sugar puts so much less stress on the body. Our system was not meant handle processed sugar and getting it cleaned out of the body day in day out really takes its toll. Noticed how you get more spots when you eat a lot of chocolate? It’s because the skin is an organ of detoxification and if the other organs in the body that clear unnatural foodstuffs are over-loaded then the toxins will be pushed out through your skin.

Natural water without having to remember to carry a bottle with you everywhere!

Our bodies need water to function properly. Without it, all our vital systems lack oxygen and just can’t work properly. It affects our joints, muscles and connective tissues too – all those things that we want to keep in the best state possible. If we eat more fruit and vegetables we’ll get water in its natural state – packaged inside some beautifully sweet-tasting fruit!

Now perhaps you are asking: “How does she know all this?” Well, that’s because eating healthily has literally changed my life.

I had my hypermobility diagnosed in 2008, but I’d been suffering for many years; RSI making my academic life hell, lower back problems putting me out of action over and over again while neck and shoulder problems plagued me from a very early age.

2008 was the worst I’d been. A problem with my neck and shoulder was so bad I had to leave the course of study I was on. I couldn’t hold my head up for long without muscle spasm and immense pain. I spent months in bed and became very depressed.

After what was a very long, dark time I was finally diagnosed with EDS and got to work with a great physiotherapist.

I decided that I wanted to do everything I could to improve my health. I started researching diet and was amazed at what I found. I learnt about how many of the food stuffs we take as normal (e.g. bread, milk, soy) can be highly allergenic. I learnt how our body is constantly detoxifying, and how, if we put unnatural substances into it, it has to work really to get rid of them. I learnt how many of the animal products we eat are full of chemicals and hormones that have been routinely used to treat the animals. I learnt how natural, raw foods are not only choc full of vitamins and minerals, but also include enzymes which make them easier to digest than processed food. I learnt how greens are a wonder food – not only providing minerals in abundance, but also actually improving the way our body digests.

There are plenty of resources, freely available online, written by doctors and enthusiasts alike, which provide evidence and experience to champion healthy eating.

I decided to become my own tester. It’s simple and cheap – I’d recommend giving it a go! ‘Try on’ a healthy diet for a few meals, a few days and see what it does for you. I did just that and I’ve never looked back.

I started to make changes to the way I ate. I cut down on the amount of animal produce and included a lot more fruit and vegetables. I found not only did I love it, but I felt and looked so much healthier. Without trying, I lost weight I never thought I’d lose, my skin cleared up and my eyes started to sparkle. I had more energy and slept better. I got ill with colds and passing bugs much less frequently. Importantly, along with the physiotherapy, the state of my joints and muscles improved. They hurt less often and with less intensity, and when I had a setback it was shorter and I healed more quickly.

I was so sold that I continued to work on my diet. I now eat a diet very high in fresh fruit and vegetables. I don’t eat any animal produce and I don’t cook my food.

You might think this is extreme, but, boy, it works for me! I feel the best I have ever done. I haven’t had a cold for over 2 years. I love the shape of my body. Even better, I love the food I am eating. Our taste buds are amazingly flexible. They adjust to new flavours very easily. For example, once I took processed sugar out of my diet I really started to taste the sweetness of natural produce. Now I can get my sugar kick from apples, oranges, pineapple and mango with no guilt!

Importantly, my hypermobility has improved immeasurably – I couldn’t even pick up a book two years ago and was in constant pain, now I frequently walk home from the shops with several shopping bags. I can exercise, engage in most pursuits and live relatively normally. A lot of this success is due to my wonderful physiotherapist and my own determination to strengthen, but I don’t doubt that a substantial part of my recovery has been due to my dietary changes.

My improved health and increased vitality has sky-rocketed my self confidence and general happiness. I’ve had the confidence to be able to start pursuing the things I’ve always wanted to – I’m much more creative in my everyday life and I’ve even moved to a different country, something I’d wanted to do from a very young age!

Who knows what it could do for you?

It’s super easy and tasty to ‘healthify’ your diet. How about trying a fruit smoothie? They are easy to make with a regular blender.

So, if you’ve got a blender get it out of the cupboard. Put it on the work surface in your kitchen. Then it’s there, ready to make you gorgeous fruit-based smoothies that your body will thank you for every day – loads of vitamins and minerals and natural hydration. If you’re up for it add some greens too – they’ll make it a wicked colour and you’ll send your mineral quota shooting up for the day.

Try this recipe for size:

• Get two really ripe pears. Quarter them and remove the cores. Then dice them roughly and put them in your blender. Pop the lid on the blender and pulse the blades until the pear is liquid.

• Chop a third of a medium cucumber and add in with the pears. Do the same thing with the pulse button to liquidise the cucumber.

• Take two large handfuls of spinach and add them to the blender. Blend again until the spinach is incorporated and you have a nice smooth liquid.

• Pour all this into a glass and sit back and enjoy the taste!

You can watch me showing you how to make this delicious and easy smoothie here: http://www.pathlesstrodden.com/pear-spinach-smoothie/

For more information on my diet and hypermobility journey, as well as recipes and a chance to sign up to my ezine check out my website.

Give your body a break and the chance to work the way it was intended to work!

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The Good and The Bad About Sugar

While current research has shown that people in general have reduced their consumption of fat, there are more alarming findings about sugar consumption. Obesity has now been declared a worldwide epidemic and statistical evidence suggests that obesity has more to do with sugar consumption than fat consumption.

We need a reasonable understanding of different sugars in order to make the right choices. As this may get a little too technical for some people, I have relegated a list of definitions to the end of this article.

Sugars of one type occur naturally in foods like fruits and vegetables. Processed sugars which have a different constitution are added to foods, fruit juices and other drinks as sweeteners in order to make the products more palatable. Herein lies the difference between what is good and what is bad.

We need to differentiate between sugars classified as monosaccharides and disaccharides and then we need to get familiar with the terms fructose, sucrose, glucose, lactoseand galactose. Then, there’s the role glucose vs. glycogen in our bodies. It gets complicated so let’s keep to the essentials.

Monosaccharides

Monosaccharides are the simplest form of sugar and include fructose, glucose and galactose.

Fructose occurs naturally in fruits, honey, berries and most root vegetables. Your consumption of the foods in which it occurs naturally is healthy. Other monosaccharides include glucose and galactose.

A U.S. survey reveals that about 9% of average caloric intake comes from fructose. Only one-third of this fructose comes from fruit, while the other two-thirds come from added refined sugars; this is where you will find a correlation between unhealthy sugar consumption and obesity.

Disaccharides

Disaccharidesare carbohydrates that are created when two monosaccharides are joined. The best known disaccharides is sucrose, commonly known as table sugar, in which a fructose molecule is joined with a glucose molecule. Another common disaccharide is lactose, found only in milk, in which a glucose and a galactose molecule are combined.

Glucose

Glucose is a sugar that our metabolism converts into energy. Our brain and other tissues require a constant supply of blood glucose to survive. Glucose, transported via the bloodstream, is the primary source of energy for the body’s cells; it is the prime metabolic fuel source for most organisms, from bacteria to humans.

Our body produces glucose when we digest the sugar and starch that are contained in carbohydrates. Such foods include rice, grains, pasta, potatoes, fruits and vegetables. Enzymes break down the starch and sugar into glucose which is absorbed into our bloodstream. The glucose combines with insulin and together they provide the energy for our muscles and brain.

It is vital to our health to keep glucose levels within a normal range. Because the energy originates from the foods we eat, our body has a mechanism for maintaining a normal range. This mechanism is seated in our liver which stores excess glucose as glycogen.

Glucose and glycogen

Our body absorbs glucose from the foods we eat and this may obviously occur irregularly. The glucose that the body does not use immediately is converted into glycogen.

Glycogen is a chain of glucose sub-units stored primarily in the liver and in our muscles. This glycogen is used to buffer our blood glucose level. For example, our muscles use the glycogen stored in the liver for energy during strenuous exercise.

What is important in our pursuit of fat loss is the fact that any glucose in excess of the needs for energy and storage as glycogen is converted to fat. This is the underlying cause for the common argument that claims as follows:

  1. Fruit contains fructose.
  2. Fructose turns to fat.
  3. If you want to lose fat, do not eat fruit.

This argument is essentially false because it ignores the way in which our body metabolizes fructose.

Fructose and glycogen

Fructose can stimulate lipogenesis which means the accumulation and storage of fat. However, fructose is primarily stored in our liver as glycogen. The liver can comfortably handle a daily intake of 50 grams of fructose without storing any extra fat and it can store 100 grams of glycogen.

This is an important observation. A normal piece of fresh fruit contains approximately 6-7 grams of fructose so you would need to eat more than 5-7 pieces of fruit in a day to absorb 50 g. In contrast, you can very easily absorb more than 50 g of fructose by drinking a lot of carbonated soft drinks, or drinks sweetened with fructose corn syrup.

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) consumption has increased dramatically and is now a main contributor to obesity. You need to understand the following misconceptions:

  • People confuse HFCS with fructose that occurs naturally in fresh fruit.
  • The entire weight of a piece of fruit is not made up of fructose; most of the weight is fiber.

Conclusion

You will suffer no ill effects from eating several pieces of fresh fruit on a daily basis. What you need to steer away from is HFCS consumption and processed sugars added as sweeteners to food products and drinks.

Additional definitions:

Fructose

Fructose, or fruit sugar, is one of three dietary monosaccharides, the other two being glucose and galactose. All three are absorbed into our blood stream during digestion.

Fructose is a naturally occurring sugar, typically found in fruits, honey, berries and most root vegetables. It is the most water-soluble of all sugars. In plants, fructose may exist as a monosaccharide and/or a component of sucrose. in scientific terms called a disaccharide.

Commercially, fructose is derived from sugar cane, sugar beets and corn. Derived from these sources, it comes in three forms:

  • Crystalline fructoseis the monosaccharide and has high purity when it has been dried and ground.
  • High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a mixture of glucose and fructose.
  • Sucrose (see definition below) is commonly added to foods, fruit juices and other drinks as a taste enhancement.

Sucrose

Sucrose is a complex carbohydrate that exists naturally in fruits and vegetables and occurs in greatest quantities in sugar cane and sugar beets. The food industry separates the sugar from these plants to produce table sugar and sweeteners which are added to foods, fruit juices and other drinks.

During digestion, sucrose is broken down into its constituent monosaccharides, glucose and fructose. The glucose and fructose molecules are absorbed into our blood stream and causes a rapid rise in blood glucose levels. This can cause problems for people who suffer from hypoglycemia or diabetes.

Galactose

This is a simple sugar found in lactose that is less sweet than glucose (table sugar). It is a monosaccharide (see above) that comes mainly from milk and milk products. Galactose is metabolized primarily in our liver into glucose 1-phosphate.

Lactose

A sugar formed by galactose and glucose found mainly in milk where it occurs at 2-8% by weight. When we consume milk, an enzyme called lactase breaks down lactose into glucose and galactose. Because of hereditary factors of food sources, European people are generally far more tolerant of lactose than people from Africa and Asia. People who are intolerant to lactose may suffer bloating and flatulence when they consume milk products.

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